REBIRTH ORBIT

Since the successful deployment of the British Skylon rocket in 2021, a fleet of reusable spacecraft are now tasked not only with “delivering” equipment to orbit and stations but also “collecting” floating debris, a necessary planetary public service spurred by the 2009 catastrophic collision above Taymyr Peninsula in Siberia.

 

Moscow Garbage Ring

In a revival of the Soviet VINITE, the new ministry of technical aesthetics commenced management of the cycles and relationships through media of disposable waste packaging. Since garbage chutes in buildings were banned and 70% of all manufactured goods are now made from byproducts, the former 1500 illegal landfills encircling moscow were transformed into a 2500 hectare ecological park. It is ever-growing as illegal sites of practice continue to be uncovered and recultivated.

Copernican Dive

A media institution mounted a global campaign to expose widespread oceanic dumping in parallel with the controlled return of the International Space Station (ISS) to Point Nemo. Also known as the Pole of Inaccessibility, this is the farthest point from human civilisation in the Arctic Ocean and had become infamous as the graveyard for retired spacecraft that re-entered earth’s atmosphere in controlled de-orbit, including the Soviet space station Mir in 2001. Historic attention for this particular site, and space fetishisation in general, assembled an audience to generate a massive global debate that triggered implementation of tracing systems for unethical and illegal oceanic dumping.

Black Sky Coordinates

At the turn of the twenty-first century, millions of people on earth were dying from exposure to air pollution and an estimated one in two Russian citizens were living in regions where air quality exceeded health guideline limits. “Black Sky Mode” in Krasnoyarsk was declared 50-80 times a year due to toxic aluminum production, coal plants, high-rise buildings and lowland typography. Krasnoyarsk was the first city to deploy citizen-led technological sensing of air quality that collected hard data and mounted a protest forcing aluminium and metallurgic factories to eliminate pollution under nationally enforced law.

RIVER IN DEATH VALLEY

A former coal mining region that operated until its abandonment and liquidation at the collapse of the soviet union, known as the “River in the Death Valley” in the Nenets language, has been repurposed as the proving grounds for the Russian Military in an expansion of climate geoengineering by cirrus cloud spraying with aircraft and autonomous drones in the upper latitudes of the atmosphere.

Deep Sekretiki

The Komi region is representative of a long history of leaking and deteriorated Soviet oil infrastructure of pipes and wells in Russia that have inflicted a slow and steady violence on the countries communities and ecologies. The rapid decline of oil demand in 2020 forced well shut-ins on a massive scale, calling first for oil to remain in the ground and a repurposing of thousands of super- deep infrastructures into long term storage facilities for captured carbon dioxide from energy plants.

Flight-Path Zapovednik

In the final decades of Russia’s lease on the site of the Baikonur cosmodrome in the remote steppe desert landscape of Kazakhstan. Funds from the $115 rental fee were reallocated to a transition program to ensure safe transfer not only of the closed space launch site but of the entire territory beneath the flight path where thousands of tons of toxic rocket boosters bleeding fuel had landed over a century. The land was remediated and cultivated as a contemporary, artificial version of a Soviet Zapovednik, open to surrounding Kazakh communities for crop production.

Nuclear Ikea

Zheleznogorsk, formerly closed Soviet city Krasnoyarsk-26, draws back on its secret history in nuclear development to become the safe storage facility for the entire planet’s nuclear waste. Rosatom constructed and continue to manage the subterranean facility capable of storing an estimated 230 years worth of spent nuclear fuel imported to the site both from inside and outside the Russian territory. Rosatom provides now full construction facilities for those countries that do not have expertise or space for nuclear management.

Oceanic Swarm

At the turn of the twenty-first century, millions of people on earth were dying from exposure to air pollution and an estimated one in two Russian citizens were living in regions where air quality exceeded health guideline limits. “Black Sky Mode” in Krasnoyarsk was declared 50-80 times a year due to toxic aluminum production, coal plants, high-rise buildings and lowland typography. Krasnoyarsk was the first city to deploy citizen-led technological sensing of air quality that collected hard data and mounted a protest forcing aluminium and metallurgic factories to eliminate pollution

 

“Where there is nothing—or where we imagine there is nothing—everything appears possible” - Nicholas de Monchaux, Kosmos.

Welcome to Daleko, a future world where the concept of waste has been reimagined through the dual meaning of its name - a spatial and temporal reference to distant imaginaries, both far away and in the future. These two facets are entangled as the future reaches back in time to revive or reject conditions of waste management on planet Earth. The concept of waste as a social, spatial and economic externality is a problematic condition that has been historically perpetuated. Another, external space where waste is sent to is a psychotic delusion. In the Terraforming project of a planetary plan for a viable future, we want to confront waste streams on deeper time scales and expanded frames of value. Waste has been reconceptualised by diverting surveillance from individual bodies and objects to sense the flows and streams of matter as a valuable resource. Daleko is composed of fragments - animated science fictions - narrated from a future where specific crises of waste-as-externality have taken on entirely new value. The composition of Daleko evolved from Russia at a planetary scale, with fictions set in urban and regional spaces, inside and outside the Russian Territory in terrestrial, oceanic, atmospheric and cosmic places. A complex global condition, the number of fragments that compose the future world of waste can be innumerable as sensing at scale expands.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Researchers: Eleanor Peres, Anastasia Sinitsyna, Tigran Kostandyan and Tim Nosov
The Terraforming 2020, Strelka Institute for Media Architecture and Design
Program Director: Benjamin H. Bratton
Program Tutors: Nicolay Boyadjiev, Lisa Dorrer
Impossible without: Elena Mozgovaya, Vlad Ilkevich,
Olga Tenisheva, Timur Zolotoev, George Papamattheakis
Research Collaborators: Jussi Parikka, Angelina Davydova, Alan Synnott
Editor: Theo Merz

DALEKO ДАЛЕКО

 

“Where there is nothing—or where we imagine there is nothing—everything appears possible” - Nicholas de Monchaux, Kosmos.

Welcome to Daleko, a future world where the concept of waste has been reimagined through the dual meaning of its name - a spatial and temporal reference to distant imaginaries, both far away and in the future. These two facets are entangled as the future reaches back in time to revive or reject conditions of waste management on planet Earth. The concept of waste as a social, spatial and economic externality is a problematic condition that has been historically perpetuated. Another, external space where waste is sent to is a psychotic delusion. In the Terraforming project of a planetary plan for a viable future, we want to confront waste streams on deeper time scales and expanded frames of value. Waste has been reconceptualised by diverting surveillance from individual bodies and objects to sense the flows and streams of matter as a valuable resource. Daleko is composed of fragments - animated science fictions - narrated from a future where specific crises of waste-as-externality have taken on entirely new value. The composition of Daleko evolved from Russia at a planetary scale, with fictions set in urban and regional spaces, inside and outside the Russian Territory in terrestrial, oceanic, atmospheric and cosmic places. A complex global condition, the number of fragments that compose the future world of waste can be innumerable as sensing at scale expands.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Researchers: Eleanor Peres, Anastasia Sinitsyna, Tigran Kostandyan and Tim Nosov
The Terraforming 2020, Strelka Institute for Media Architecture and Design
Program Director: Benjamin H. Bratton
Program Tutors: Nicolay Boyadjiev, Lisa Dorrer
Impossible without: Elena Mozgovaya, Vlad Ilkevich,
Olga Tenisheva, Timur Zolotoev, George Papamattheakis
Research Collaborators: Jussi Parikka, Angelina Davydova, Alan Synnott
Editor: Theo Merz